Saturday, May 12, 2012

The Precise Wonder of Our Universe

Me being deep.

"I go to seek a great perhaps."


What a fantastical statement. To go experience what had been up until a certain point out of reach.

  These are the supposed last words of Francois Rabelais the  French Renaissance writer, doctor, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. What an interesting idea, not only applied to after death but also to discovery, and outer space. What is out there? As a Christian I view our existence as an opportunity to enjoy and explore creation, and that includes beyond our humble bubble of a world. While I ink in my Astronaut painting I listen to TED lectures on space. It's fascinating, and marvelous that we have the technology to send a probe to traverse the heavens, to have it turn around, and then take a picture of the earth. In said picture our blue berry planet is pin-prick sized.
Click that link, it's truly awe inspiring. The precious life we live here on earth boggles my mind and gives me a thankful heart.

below is what I completed for the day, and it took me a solid hour and a half.
This is what happened when I told my mother this..


Mom: "Pathetic"

Me: "Are you kidding? It took two years for some guy (Michelangelo) four years to finish painting a ceiling (The Sistine Chapel)! Gosh!"

     Of course we joke with each other, but honestly it takes a long time to get lines right, and then to carefully trace them. There is a misconception that because one has artistic ability it it is no longer difficult to do. That is a very, very frustrating myth. It's flipping hard, but it's a challenge that us as artists enjoy. If it were easy it would be pointless. Part of what makes a work of art so great is the effort and precise clarity within it's creation.

It's that same preciseness that fills both artists and scientists with awe, and pushes us to create, explore and share with the world.  




Stay Artsy & DFTBA

Sarah Bosserman




2 comments:

  1. I really wish I could draw like you! I'm really creative, but I can but scetch a little - drawing and painting are not my strengths.

    Mary Jane
    http://ahintofredness.blogspot.com/

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    Replies
    1. Just keep working at it, and remember, stick men are classics! On a more serious note, it does take time, but if you really want better drawing/painting skills, practice, practice, practice. Oh, and have FUN with it! :)
      Also, thank you for all your comments, they mean a lot!

      Sarah Bosserman

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